Hor d'oeuvres
Grapefruit Terrine in Cointreau
Terrine de pamplemousse à Cointreau
Soupe
Cream of Red Pepper with Crème Fraiche

Crème de soupe au poivre rouge avec crème fraîche

Poisson ou Poulet
Herbed Chicken Medallions in Lemon Cream Sauce
Médaillons de poulet d'herbe dans la sauce de crème de citron
 Salade
Mixed Greens with Watercress and Pear
Mélanger les légumes verts avec le cresson et la poire​
Sorbet
Basil-Mint Lemon Sorbet
Sorbet à la menthe au basilic et au citron
Entree
Herb Encrusted Lamb Chops in White Wine Sauce
Côtelettes d'agneau en croûte d'herbe dans des sauces de vin blanc​
Dessert
Buttermilk-Vanilla Panna Cotta in Vanilla & Berry Sauce

Panna cotta vanille babeurre avec sauce aux baies

 Boisson Specialites

Citrus Champagne Cocktail 

Cocktail de Champagne d'agrumes


  Coffee Royale

Café royale


Shooters

Tireurs


Stella Rosa Wines

Vins Stella Rosa


Freixenet Champagnes

Champagnes de Freixenet 
Boisson 

TEA (Thé) [sweet, peach, mango]

WATER (Eau) [distilled, bottled, San Pelligrino]

COFFEE  (Café) [regular, spice blend, chicory, chicory blend]

TISANE (Tisane) [green tea, chamomile tea, peppermint tea, blends]







 
 

RESERVATION FOR FINE DINING

PLEASE USE THE FORM BELOW

For INQUIRIES & RESERVATIONS at 901.687.3370 


You can also email us at pepper@lebistropepper.com. Fine Dining is available by reservation only. Seating begins at 7 p.m. Seating is limited.


This is Fine Dining in a casual, comfortable atmosphere without the crowd. The 7-course dining price is 150.00 per person which includes one bottle of wine, tax, and gratuity.


Payment is made at the time of reservation. Seating begins promptly at 7 p.m. Your table is reserved until closing at 10 p.m. Your table is reserved exclusively for you and  your guests. Menu selections are made by the CHEF. Do not reserve, if you have any extreme dietary concerns. However, any special concerns can be expressed at the time of reservation. 

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We cordially invite you to be among the FIRST to enjoy fine dining at Le Bistro Pepper.


It has been a while since Oscar Wilde consecrated the cucumber sandwich as the bite-sized symbol of the British upper class. Now that chefs are busy opening burger joints and chicken-wing houses, the days seem numbered for fancy dining rooms.


Writer Anya von Bremzen makes a case for why we need haute places more than ever and why he thought fine dining mattered. “Because a great restaurant,” he replied, “creates an illusion of a life where everyone is happy to see us, every need is met, and everything tastes better.

Le Bistro Pepper | The New Fine Dining

Le Bistro Pepper


FINE DINING

Fine dining may bring to mind crisp tablecloths, violins in the background, multiple courses, and dishes that you can't pronounce.


Well, we are a bit different; we have the multiple courses, may or may not use tablecloths, no violin player--but beautiful soft music, and if you cannot pronounce one of our dishes--just ask a server.  Relax!  We got  you!  However, most importantly, the food is phenomenal!


What can you expect?

1.  Attention to detail

2.  Great servers with plenty of smiles

3.  Escorting to table and pulling out of chair for women

4.  Replacing linen napkins, when necessary

5.  Crumbing the table in between courses

6.  Great service in a timely manner and some of the best food possible

7.  Great atmosphere


What you will NOT get...

1.  Choice of the menu.  We currently offer three fine-dining menus.  They will be discussed with you at the time of booking.

2.  Anything paper or plastic, except the menu, of course.

3.  A wide liquor selection.  In fact, we only offer a few select wines that have been chosen to complement the meal.  In addition, we do have a few specialty drinks, such as French 75 and Armagnac coffee.

4.  Rudeness or pressure to finish.  Your table is yours from your booking time until we close!

5.  The opportunity to smoke.  We are a smoke-free facility.

6.  Fluent-speakers of the French language.  We are working on it!

7.  Valet parking.


"for the experience like no other"

Sample 7-Course Menu

5 reasons one should embrace fine dining


This is the eleventh installment of "Eat This List" - a regularly recurring list of things chefs, farmers, writers and other food experts think you ought to know about. This article’s contributor is John Winterman, maitre d' at Daniel restaurant in New York City.  He shares...


I can be as casual as the next guy. I'm from Indiana, so I don't have much choice. But I know the difference between the ballpark and the opera house, between a dive bar and The French Laundry. As the maitre d' at Daniel, I get to work in one of the finest fine dining establishments in the world. The restaurant exudes charm and flair, a hybrid of modern French-American style be it on the plate or in the service, a place that requires jackets and frowns on jeans. That being said, it is a balancing act. We defend a standard of dining in a time where a chef can earn three Michelin stars while eschewing silver, crystal and a jacket policy. Upholding a standard is ever more critical as you try to justify separating people from their money on a nightly basis. Herein, a dollop of wisdom on why fine dining still matters.


1. Forget the special occasion Everyone wants to celebrate at a fancy restaurant: graduation, engagements, promotions, divorces, mergers, recording deals, sneaker contracts. As far as I am concerned, every morning when I shuffle across the street in my jammies to free-base Americanos, pick up the New York Times and not see my name in the obituaries is a reason to celebrate. Why wait for an occasion? Life is an occasion.


2. Fine dining is affordable luxuryYes, when you start looking at check averages that hover above $200 per person before tax and tip, you start doing math in your head. But when you place yourself in an environment that is at once tactile and serene, where you have one staff member for every two diners, where there is a small army capable of occupying Paris tending to a rare and elegant product, the actual cost is truly not exorbitant. Break it down per hour: if you hit $250 per person, you will most likely be dining for three-plus hours, roughly $80 per hour. You cannot get a spa treatment for that, nor a lawyer, nor a Ferrari, nor a weekend in St. Bart’s. When it comes to comparable luxury items, it is nearly impossible. There are no starter-priced $400,000 sports cars or villas next door to Mick Jagger on Mustique. Most of us will never touch a private jet or buy a Patek-Philippe watch, but we can pop in for a tasting of white truffle risotto for comparatively little money.


3. Fine dining has more than one entry point You can come to the lounge at Daniel and have a bespoke cocktail, perfect canapés, maybe try a few artisanal cheeses. The few restaurants that fall into our category have an entry-priced prix fixe menu, bars and lounges, à la carte options, wines by the glass, dessert tastings. You can dip a toe without taking the plunge.


4. Why be obvious? Anyone can go to a beer garden wearing retro-high tops. Anyone can follow a burger trend. But no matter the blend of luxury ingredients or the rarity of the kicks, the fact remains that it is still a hamburger or a sneaker. Over a career dating back now more than 20 years, I have served any number of unique clients who embraced a few stolen moments of pampering at a high-end restaurant. I've walked legendary musician Lou Reed through a multi-course tasting menu, opened Dom Perignon Rosé for Metallica's Lars Ulrich, guided actor Jason Biggs through an entire white truffle and called my mother when I realized Roger Waters from Pink Floyd knew my name. The common thread throughout is that everyone got dressed, donned a sexy jacket with a high-collared shirt and became willing participants in on ongoing stage show called Haute Cuisine.


5. Sensory emotion A Walkman, an old Honda, my Rachael Ray cookbooks - the world is full of my cast-off objects. The allure of the material is fleeting and instant. The allure of cuisine endures. I carry distinct memories of first tastes, such as oysters at Acme in New Orleans, 1928 Cheval Blanc in the studio kitchen at Charlie Trotter’s in Chicago and Laurent Gras’ lacquered pork belly at the Fifth Floor in San Francisco. My mind reels at the list of special meals: white truffles in December, Brillat-Savarin cheese in summer, a surreptitious taste of foie gras while I was running up the service stairs some twenty years ago. We come together at a table for many reasons – to celebrate, to laugh, to declare war. The material fades but the tastes and aromas linger, direct links to our most primal instincts and the only true sensual pleasure we share in a room full of strangers.


John Winterman, maitre d' at Daniel restaurant in New York City